Method, Money Management, Mindset

Applying both a reliable method and money management strategy (that fits with that method) in a consistent manner will set you up for the proper mindset to execute that method in the first place. The mindset that is most effective is a relaxed mind. One of the biggest mistakes we make as traders is to think that there is something wrong with us when we keep making emotionally driven trading decisions that get us into trouble. Much of that is due to having no structure from which to make trading decisions, using predictive methods that rely on hope and belief, or thinking we should be able to jump in or out at every turn. In this video, I try to get across how method, money management, and mindset come together for me when I’m doing it all properly.

What Is A Trading Setup?

A trading setup is a set of conditions that come together in a particular way, indicating a probability of one thing happening over another. It’s like a weather event that happens when certain conditions come together in the atmosphere. First, we must define the conditions within price flow so that we can recognize them coming together and follow their process. The conditions we will use will be 2 of the market structure components that make up a swing. In this video, you will learn about the gap impulse and the shelf and how we can lean on it after certain conditions are met.

How To Structure a Trade Plan: WEAT

This is a Clip from one of our Language Of Markets Live Sessions. I show how to structure a trading plan from beginning to end using a daily WEAT chart which is an ETF of the Wheat futures market. Having a plan of the things you can control goes a long way when it comes to your trading consistency and conserving phycological energy. See Foundations Of Trading Part 6 post for more on trade planning. Your trade plans will be unique to your needs but you can use this as a guide.

Basically, know your method and design rules for:

  • Entry: Know what gets you in
  • Initial stop: know where your stop goes
  • Money management: Know your position size and trade management after in trade
  • Exit: know what gets you out

The Gap on the Left

In this video, I will show you a simple visual way to read the flow of the market. Big Gaps are easy to see on the chart, our eye naturally gets drawn to them. A gap is a quick supply-demand imbalance that pushes all the guessing traders (contraction) into or out of their positions (expansion). Use this simple framework to make observations then create your own ways to trade it using those observations.

How Swings Grow Up and Expand

In these blogs, we have done a lot of work on mapping markets with swings. In this post, we will look at how minor swings grow up to be major swings and ways we can read and trade this dynamic. These will fall under the category of type 2 trades, expand then continue. Its a type of waiting outside the immediate price action that can be very relaxing. You can read about “The 3 Types of Trades” options on the Language of Markets home page.

One-Line Practice For Personal Insight

In our live sessions, we spent much of the month learning to read and trade with just one line. We can anchor this line consistently on various components of the swings that we structure and then use it to learn. This is one of our simple practices that will enable your own personal learning and insight into how markets move. True learning must come from intuitive comprehension. Approach the practice with curiosity and discovery and leave expectations behind.

After The Storm: The E-Mini S&P Weekly

In the previous post to “Mapping The S&P E-Mini Weekly. It’s About Them, Not You“. We calmly mapped the weekly S&P E-Mini with swings right into the apex of the storm. In this video, we follow up on that along with the weekly stocks mapped (AAPL, VRTX, AVGO, SQ, BAC, and GILD). I used 2 simple techniques, swings, and where price came from. It’s not the method that’s important, its the presence clarity it can bring to our trade decisions.

Mapping The S&P E-Mini Weekly

We all see things differently and mostly experience markets through past personal experiences which distorts what is going on. We especially get our buttons pushed during times of high volatility and uncertainty. Mapping markets simply and objectively always needs to be the starting point, to orient ourselves to “What Is” rather than what we want or don’t want. It’s not a trader’s job to predict markets, it’s our job to follow and join them no matter what they are doing. In this video, I map out the E-Mini S&P weekly chart along with a few stocks, AAPL, VRTX, AVGO, SQ, BAC, and GILD.